Little Known Black History Fact: Frederick Douglass’ 4th of July Speech

Black America Web

[ione_abacast_player uid=”6294″ popupurl=”http://filesource.abacast.com/reachmediainc/070414/070414LKBHF.mp3″ version=”v5″]

Frederick Douglass and his stance against the practice of slavery has been documented and discussed at length over the years. A prolific orator and activist, the former slave and anti-slavery movement leader was sought after to speak at a variety of events during his career.

One such speech, “The Meaning Of The Fourth Of July For The Negro,” has been hailed as his most moving work. Douglass delivered the speech on July 5, 1852 in Rochester, N.Y. at the Corinthian Hall, which was an event held by the Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society to celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

It appears that Douglass was invited to champion the virtues of America’s independence and how it related to the supposed good fortunes of Black Americans. While Douglass did open his speech seemingly in support of the founding fathers, he shifted the tone radically while expressing his…

View original post 244 more words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: